Professor Image of REBECCA JEAN EMIGH

REBECCA JEAN EMIGH

Professor

Ph. D., University of Chicago

Work Phone:
310-206-9546
Fax:
310-206-9838
E-Mail:
emigh@soc.ucla.edu
Mailing Address:
UCLA Department of Sociology
264 Haines Hall, Box 951551
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1551

Subfield

Economy and Society, Theory, Culture, Historical and Comparative Sociology, Historical Demography, Quantitative and Qualitative Methodology

Research Interests

Historical Sociology, Theory, Historical Demography, Economic Sociology, Culture, Quantitative and Qualitative Methods.

Selected Publications

The Undevelopment of Capitalism: Sectors and Markets in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009. 

“What Influences Official Information? Exploring Aggregate Microhistories of the Catasto of 1427.” Pp. 199-223 in Small Worlds: Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory, edited by James F. Brooks, Christopher R. N. DeCorse, and John Walton. Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research Press, 2008. 

“Internal and External Ethnic Assessments in Eastern Europe.” (with Patricia Ahmed and Cynthia Feliciano.) Social Forces 86(1):231-255, 2007. “The Unmaking of Markets: A Composite Visual History.” Vectors: Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular 1, 2005. [Online]. Available: 
http://vectors.iml.annenberg.edu/index.php?page=7&projectCurrent=The%20Unmaking%20of%20Markets&projectId=5&issueCurrent=1 (Opened at the MOCA, Los Angeles, March 3, 2005). 

“Household Composition in Post-Socialist Eastern Europe.” (with first author, Patricia Ahmed). The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 25(3):9-41, 2005. 

“The Great Debates: Transitions to Capitalisms.” Pp. 355-380 in Remaking Modernity: Politics, History, and Sociology, edited by Julia Adams, Elisabeth S. Clemens, and Ann Shola Orloff. Durham: Duke University Press, 2005. 

“[The] Transition(s) to Capitalism(s)?: A Review Essay.” Comparative 
Studies in Society and History 46(1):188-198, 2004. 

"Economic Interests and Sectoral Relations: The Undevelopment of Capitalism in Fifteenth-Century Tuscany." American Journal of Sociology 108(5):1075-1113, 2003. 

"Property Devolution in Tuscany." The Journal of Interdisciplinary History XXXIII(3):385-420, 2003.

"Numeracy or Enumeration? The Uses of Numbers by States and Societies." Social Science History 26(4):653-698, 2002. 

"Post-Colonial Journeys: Historical Roots of Immigration and Integration." (with first author, Dylan Riley) Comparative Sociology 1(2):169-191, 2002.